Making Decisions

Use The 10-10-10 Rule To Make Decisions

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Decision-making is one of the hardest things we do both professionally and in our personal life. It’s happened to all of us. We make snap business decisions that we come to regret because we haven’t given ourselves enough time to weigh the odds and think it through. Or, we may vacillate and go back and forth not knowing which option to choose. A good night’s sleep can often work wonders or just discussing the situation with colleagues often clarifies the situation. But not always. Authors Chip Heath and Dan Heath explore taking another perspective in the August __ , 2013, issue of Fast Company. In their article, The 10/10/10 Rule For Tough Decisions, they recall a strategy invented by Suzy Welch, a business writer. She called it the 10/10/10 Rule. Basically, her premise is that we think about a difficult decision from three perspectives:

  • How will we feel about it 10 minutes from now?
  • How about 10 months from now?
  • How about 10 years from now?

This type of decision making removes some of the short-term emotions and helps us focus on what may be important in the future. With less emphasis on the current situation, a decision may become more obvious. Thinking about a decision from a long-term view may change the way you view the current circumstances.  Ask yourself if the outcome will be important 10 minutes from now, 10 months from and 10 years from now. An example of when this rule may be helpful is if there is a disagreement with a colleague. Will confrontation serve a purpose 10 months from now? Or even 10 years from now if you are both at the same firm? If you want to read the entire article, go to the Fast Company link: http://www.fastcompany.com/3007613/10-10-10-rule-tough-decisions. Or check out How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work by Chip Heath and Dan Heath.

When are you going to try out the 10/10/10 Rule?

Computer Screens: The Bigger The Better?

Computer Screen

With less paper in the office, many of us find that we do a lot of reading and work on our computers. Do larger screens or several monitors make it any easier? The consensus seems to be “yes”.  Once you try two monitors, there’s no going back, according to Dave Kinsey, president of Total Networks.  Several studies show that, with two monitors, tasks are completed more quickly with fewer errors compared to using one monitor. How nice to have several screens open at one time without having to switch back and forth!

If two monitors are great, why not five or six? Kinsey cites a paperless law office that does just this. The six monitors are open to calendars, email, the company’s practice management program, documents, a screen for another application and the two end screens in landscape which are perfect for spreadsheets. The monitors cover a lot of screen real estate. When you can read  two documents side by side, the need to print out or keep paper is almost completely eliminated.

While I was mulling over the idea of how many monitors would fit on my desk, I came upon an article posted in The Lawyerist suggesting one BIG screen. Todd Hendrickson posits in his article “In a Paperless Office, A Bigger Monitor is Better” that a jumbo monitor (27” or larger) is better than multi-monitors if you spend most of your time reading and writing. The key advantage? You can see several full-page desktop views with minimal scrolling.  All it takes is a few keyboard shortcuts. In essence, it can do the same thing as multi-monitors and still leave room on your desk. For more details, check out http://lawyerist.com/in-a-paperless-office-a-bigger-monitor-is-better/.

How many monitors do you use?

Too Many Choices? It’s Hard To Decide!

Have you ever found yourself “stuck”  because there are so many good options from which to

choose? In today’s world, the possibilities are endless. Interestingly, that’s not always a plus and can often interfere

with decision-making. What to do?

Often, the best way to get things done is by process of elimination so that you are left with limited, desirable

choices. Here are two real-life examples we all face at one time or another …

… you decide to join an association to network, be part of the community and potentially meet prospective clients.

Which group should it be? Perhaps it would make sense to become part of the local Chamber of Commerce. Many of

your colleagues attend their meetings and have found it helpful to be part of the Chamber. Or, maybe

consider a business association a good friend is urging you to join. There are several excellent choices and it is hard to

decide which one would be best.

We recommend using the process of elimination to decide which association to choose. Once you have

narrowed it down to one or two associations, the decision will be easier. Plus, that overwhelmed feeling will go away.

Here is another example of too many choices. You have decided to scan all documents as soon as they arrive in the

office but have no idea which product best meet your needs and gets the job done most efficiently. The market is flooded

with scanner manufacturers with each one vying for your attention. To eliminate a number of scanners, we suggest that

beginning by listing your criteria — how you want the scanner to function and what you want to accomplish. Then you

are ready to review the scanners sold and to compare each one with the criteria you established. This process will

narrow the selection process and move it along by reducing the number of scanners in the running. Isn’t that an easy

way to limit the options? We hope you will give it a try.

 

Want to read more about how this concept works? Check out the 6/21/13 article: Choose What To

Leave Out at www.delanceyplace.com.